Technology aims for early disease detection | AG | kmaland.com – KMAland

Science & Technology

Cloudy skies this morning will become partly cloudy this afternoon. High 47F. NW winds at less than 5 mph, increasing to 10 to 20 mph..
Clear this evening then becoming cloudy after midnight. Low 16F. Winds N at 10 to 15 mph.
Updated: December 28, 2021 @ 11:49 am
Cloudy skies this morning will become partly cloudy this afternoon. High 47F. NW winds at less than 5 mph, increasing to 10 to 20 mph..
Clear this evening then becoming cloudy after midnight. Low 16F. Winds N at 10 to 15 mph.
Updated: December 28, 2021 @ 11:49 am

Research at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln has the potential to enhance individual animal-monitoring and care practices as well as create labor efficiencies in the swine industry. The research is focused on early disease detection using radio-frequency identification technology to monitor pig-feeding behavior and track what each pig eats and drinks.
A dashboard also is being developed that would provide swine producers real-time insights on feeding behaviors to help them more quickly identify sick animals.
The goal for the project is to apply the technology to a commercial operation and evaluate its implementation on a farm. The technology also would be applied to a commercial operation outside the United States to understand any global implications.
Another aspect of the project is the use of depth-camera images to weigh pigs identified through radio-frequency identification technology. The technology involves a ceiling-mounted camera that takes digital-depth images of individual pigs drinking. Data are captured on a continuous basis, and pig-weight information is available on the dashboard.
The researchers then can determine when pigs will be ready for market using true weight estimates, said Tami Brown-Brandl, a professor of biological-systems engineering at the University of Nebraska.
“The technology enables producers to sell uniform loads of animals at ideal weights,” she said. “It will enable packers to specify pigs within a tight weight range to reduce variability in cuts and inform the supply chain of a specified product.”
As the winner of Merck Animal Health’s High-Quality Pork award, the University of Nebraska received a grant of $200,000 in 2020 toward the swine-research project. The Nebraska Department of Economic Development is awarding an additional grant of $100,000 to further fund the research. Visit merck-animal-health.com for more information.
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This article originally ran on agupdate.com.
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