2022 FIBA Women's World Cup schedule, results

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The U.S. goes for its fourth consecutive title at the FIBA World Cup in Sydney — and eighth global gold in a row overall when including the Olympics.

A’ja Wilson, a two-time WNBA MVP, and Breanna Stewart, the Tokyo Olympic MVP, headline a U.S. roster that, for the first time since 2000, includes neither Sue Bird (retired) nor Diana Taurasi (injured).

The new-look team includes nobody over the age of 30 for the first time since 1994, before the U.S. began its dynasty at the 1996 Atlanta Games. The Americans have won 52 consecutive games between worlds and the Olympics dating to the 2006 Worlds bronze-medal game.

The field also includes host Australia, the U.S.’ former primary rival, and Olympic silver medalist Japan.

Nigeria, which played the U.S. the closest of any foe in Tokyo (losing by nine points), isn’t present after its federation withdrew the team over governance issues. Spain, ranked second in the world, failed to qualify.

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2022 FIBA Women’s World Cup Schedule

Date Time (ET) Game Round
Wed., Sept. 21 8:30 p.m. Puerto Rico 82, Bosnia and Herzegovina 58 Group A
9:30 p.m. USA 87, Belgium 72 Group A
11 p.m. Canada 67, Serbia 60 Group B
Thurs., Sept. 22 12 a.m. Japan 89, Mali 56 Group B
3:30 a.m. China 107, South Korea 44 Group A
6:30 a.m. France 70, Australia 57 Group B
8:30 p.m. USA vs. Puerto Rico Group A
10 p.m. Japan vs. Serbia Group B
11 p.m. Belgium vs. South Korea Group A
Fri., Sept. 23 12:30 a.m. Bosnia and Herzegovina vs. China Group A
4 a.m. Canada vs. France Group B
6:30 a.m. Australia vs. Mali Group B
Sat., Sept. 24 12:30 a.m. USA vs. China Group A
4 a.m. Bosnia and Herzegovina vs. South Korea Group A
6:30 a.m. Belgium vs. Puerto Rico Group A
Sun., Sept. 25 12:30 a.m. France vs. Mali Group B
4 a.m. Australia vs. Serbia Group B
6:30 a.m. Canada vs. Japan Group B
9:30 p.m. Belgium vs. Bosnia and Herzegovina Group A
11:30 p.m. Mali vs. Serbia Group B
Mon., Sept. 26 12 a.m. USA vs. South Korea Group A
2 a.m. France vs. Japan Group B
3:30 a.m. China vs. Puerto Rico Group A
6:30 a.m. Australia vs. Canada Group B
9:30 p.m. Puerto Rico vs. South Korea Group A
11:30 p.m. Belgium vs. China Group A
Tues., Sept. 27 12 a.m. USA vs. Bosnia and Herzegovina Group A
2 a.m. Canada vs. Mali Group B
3:30 a.m. France vs. Serbia Group B
6:30 a.m. Australia vs. Japan Group B
Wed., Sept. 28 10 p.m. Quarterfinal
Thurs., Sept. 29 12:30 a.m. Quarterfinal
4 a.m. Quarterfinal
6:30 a.m. Quarterfinal
Fri., Sept. 30 3 .m. Semifinal
5:30 a.m. Semifinal
11 p.m. Third-Place Game
Sat., Oct. 1 2 a.m. Final

Ski Jumping’s top circuit is returning to the United States for the first time in nearly two decades.

The International Ski and Snowboard Federation (FIS) men’s ski jumping World Cup will be held in February in Lake Placid, New York.

Ski jumping’s last World Cup in the U.S. was in 2004 in Park City, Utah. The circuit has not been in North America since 2009 in Vancouver.

“This is a game-changer for our organization,” USA Nordic CEO Adam Provost said “The opportunity to bring in the best ski jumpers in the world to Lake Placid will give our sport a platform for growth that we haven’t had in close to 20 years.”

Organizers were looking for a venue to host the World Cup after they planned to hold the event in Iron Mountain, Michigan, an option that became unfeasible last month.

Lake Placid, which hosted the 1980 and 1932 Winter Olympics, became an attractive alternative because the New York State Olympic Regional Development Authority recently invested millions to make its ski jumping complex world class.

“Having the World Cup back on U.S. soil is very important in developing the sport of Ski Jumping in this country, and across the world,” USA Nordic men’s and women’s ski jumping coach Anders Johnson said.

Only one American, Anders Haugen, has earned an Olympic ski jumping medal and that was at the first Winter Olympics in 1924. Haugen left the Games without any hardware, but 50 years later was awarded bronze after a scoring error was confirmed.

In an attempt to improve the chances the U.S. can compete with the world’s best ski jumpers, USA Nordic Sport began a partnership last month with Norway’s governing body in the sport. American and Norwegian national ski jumping teams will share coaches, training facilities, sports science data and efforts to attract sponsors as part of a four-year agreement.

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Max Whitlock, a six-time Olympic gymnastics medalist, is not on the British team for next month’s world championships in Liverpool.

Whitlock, 29, said on July 28 that he stopped training for 10 months after the Tokyo Games, where he won a second consecutive pommel horse gold.

“I needed to take time off,” he said on the BBC’s coverage of the Opening Ceremony of the Commonwealth Games in Birmingham, where he also did not compete.

Whitlock did say then that if the Tokyo Olympics had been held in 2020, he would have been able to compete at the 2022 Commonwealths.

Whitlock won at least one medal at every Olympics and world championships from 2012 through Tokyo before missing last fall’s worlds.

The British men’s team for Liverpool instead is led by 2019 World parallel bars champion Joe Fraser.

The top three teams at worlds qualify spots for the 2024 Paris Olympics. Nine more spots will be available at 2023 Worlds.

Great Britain was fourth at the Tokyo Games, one spot ahead of the U.S. Olympic champion Russia was unable to qualify for worlds while banned from international competition due to the war in Ukraine.

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2022 FIBA Women’s World Cup schedule, results